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The Purple and White Pawprint

What Will Become of QR Codes?

Josh Sellers, Co-Editor

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A student signing out of class using a QR scanner app on a Chromebook. The code would direct a student’s browser to a Google Form that would prompt the user to input information regarding their destination and the time of departure/return.

At the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year, a new school-wide policy was enacted. The policy required students to use the Chromebooks that had been introduced the year prior to scan a QR code on the wall before leaving the classroom. At first, most (but not all) teachers were strict towards the rule. Despite the initial stringency and the administration’s encouragement, the policy has not been upheld consistently if at all.

The question that remains is why the rule faded out. Were students too lazy to scan? Did teachers not enforce the rule well enough? Was it an easy rule to enforce in the first place?

“It was just really inconvenient and no one really wanted to get up and get out their Chromebooks. Holding this laptop to scan something is really inconvenient. They’re gonna try it next year. They’re gonna fail again,” said Spencer Brown, freshman.

Two other students also allege that laziness was the primary contributor to the rule’s decline.

“I don’t think anyone agrees with it, and we’re all really lazy, and if we have to pee, we don’t want to have to take the time to take out our phones or our Chromebooks and go and scan the code. I don’t think it’s ever gonna happen again,” said Stephanie Rose, senior.

“It’s kinda inconvenient,” said Hugh Staver, freshman. “The Chromebooks don’t really work that great. They’ll probably do it next year, too.”

While agreeing with the proposition that laziness was a reason for the failure of the policy, junior Will Smith III feels that the rule was simply hard to enforce.

“I’ve literally [seen] nobody use it. At the beginning of the year I thought it would be something that actually mattered, [but] then you’d see people walk up there and be like ‘oh look at that, I did it,’ and then they’d walk out and nobody did it at all. Ever. I find it really hard for them to enforce it because no matter what’s going on in the class, no teacher is going to care enough to be like ‘scan that. I’m gonna watch you scan it and then I’m gonna watch you fill it out.’ I also know that unless they got it to where it sent a notification to every teacher that this person signed out at this time, it wouldn’t matter [if they reinstated it] because if [a teacher] saw someone out in the hallway they’re not gonna know [whether or not] they [signed out],” Smith explained.

While the policy was reasonable, it was also easy for students to get away with not following it, and as the administration has made no obvious effort to reintroduce the rule, it does not seem likely that it will be seen again in the near future.

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What Will Become of QR Codes?